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OUR HISTORY

WE ARE FAMILY. WE CARE. WE LOVE.

 

 

We are a multi-generational congregation of Saints that are excited about The Gospel of Jesus Christ, The Holy Spirit and the Impact Our Lord has on the lives of those who walk in The Light.

The Church of Christ of the Apostolic Faith was formally organized as a congregation in the year 1910. The first site was in a small storeroom on West Goodale Street, and after a short period, the church was moved to South Oakley Avenue; then to 755 East Long Street where it remained until June of 1915. In the summer of 1915, the congregation moved to a theater building at the corner of Goodale Street and Pennsylvania Avenue. In May 1917, the congregation acquired an old church building at the corner of Collins and Pennsylvania Avenues. 

In late 1923, the old structure was torn down, and a new building erected on the site. It was dedicated on February 15, 1925. This building served as a congregational home until the church was moved to 476 South Washington Avenue in December of 1951. In 1962, two tracks of land, totaling 3.9 acres were acquired on Brentnell Avenue, adjacent to the southern boundary of the Brentnell Elementary School. This is the present site of the church. 

According to church records, the church was founded in 1910. The first Pastor was Elder Albert Roberts. The second pastor of the church was Bishop Robert C. Lawson, who led the congregation from 1914 to 1919. The third pastor was Bishop Karl F. Smith, who led the congregation from 1919 to 1972. The fourth pastor was District Elder Ernest L. Hardy, from 1972 to 1992. On May 24, 1992, Dr. Eugene Lundy was officially installed as the fifth pastor. Dr. Lundy retired from the pastorate in November 2018. On June 26, 2019, Suffragan Bishop Harold E. Rayford became the sixth pastor of this historical church. The fact that Suffragan Bishop Rayford is only the sixth pastor of this congregation since its beginning exemplifies the very stable leadership, which God has given this church.